An Open Discussion on Promoting Transparency in Social Science Research 5

By Edward Miguel (Economics, UC Berkeley)

This CEGA Blog Forum builds on a seminal research meeting held at the University of California, Berkeley on December 7, 2012. The goal was to bring together a select interdisciplinary group of scholars – from biostatistics, economics, political science and psychology – with a shared interest in promoting transparency in empirical social science research.

There has been a flurry of activity regarding research transparency in recent years, within the academy and among research funders, driven by a recognition that too many influential research findings are fragile at best, if not entirely spurious or even fraudulent.  But the increasingly heated debates on these critical issues have until now been “siloed” within individual academic disciplines, limiting their synergy and broader impacts. The December meeting (see presentations and discussions) drove home the point that there is a remarkable degree of commonality in the interests, goals and challenges facing scholars across the social science disciplines.

This inaugural CEGA Blog Forum aims to bring the fascinating conversations that took place at the Berkeley meeting to a wider audience, and to spark a public dialogue on these critical issues with the goal of clarifying the most productive ways forward.   This is an especially timely debate, given: the American Economic Association’s formal decision in 2012 to establish an online registry for experimental studies; the new “design registry” established by the Experiments in Governance and Politics, or EGAP, group; serious discussion about a similar registry in the American Political Science Association’s Experimental Research section; and the emergence of the Open Science Framework, developed by psychologists, as a plausible platform for registering pre-analysis plans and documenting other aspects of the research process. Yet there remains limited consensus regarding how exactly study registration will work in practice, and about the norms that could or should emerge around it. For example, is it possible – or even desirable – for all empirical social science studies to be registered? When and how should study registration be considered by funders and journals?

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